Five sweets more Manchego than Almodóvar

Anonim

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Muslim heritage, conventual cuisine and traditional festivities nourish the pastry cookbook of Castilla-La Mancha, one of the most “sweet tooth” communities in Spain, where a typical sweet can be found almost from every town . These are some of the most representative.

THE MAZAPAN OF TOLEDO

The Arabic root sweet, present at Christmas throughout Spain, is consumed in Toledo throughout the year, at least since 1512.

Or even before, if you consider the opinion of Clemente Palencia Flores, former municipal archivist of the city, who claims that marzipan was invented in the convent of San Clemente de Toledo after the battle of Las Navas de Tolosa, in 1212.

To qualify for the PGI, marzipans produced throughout the province of Toledo must have a content of at least 50% natural almonds and sugars .

Mazapán de Toledo

Marzipan from Toledo © Getty Images

THE FRITILLAS DE SAN REVENTÓN DE ALBACETE

Made with flour, water, oil, salt, eggs and a final touch of sprinkled sugar, they are eaten at La Roda every Tuesday of Carnival along with a cup of chocolate.

BASIN ALAJÚ

Cake-shaped, typical of Castilla, the alajú is made with almond dough, breadcrumbs and toast, fine spices and cooked honey, covered by two wafers on both sides.

You can also carry nuts or pine nuts.

A shared post by Susana Pérez (@webosfritos) on 27 Mar, 2018 at 10:10 PDT

FRIED FLOWER OF CIUDAD REAL

The “pan fruit” is very typical of the Calatrava Field area . Its shape is similar to that of the Calatrava cross, with four arms topped with fleur de lis. It is prepared by frying a molded dough of wheat flour mixed with egg and - sometimes - also milk. They are flavored with aniseed.

MIGUELITOS DE LA RODA IN ALBACETE

Originating in that town of Albacete, they are made of fine puff pastry, filled with cream and sprinkled with icing sugar.

* You can find the Gastronomic and Wine Guide of 2018 in digital version for your devices, in Apple, Zinio and Google Play .

Miguelitos de La Roda

Miguelitos de La Roda © Wikimedia Commons